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Ricar's 1st 100 jumps

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#1 jamiesmum

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 12:46 PM

Remember I was looking for somewhere on here to look after Jamie for me, well this is a video Ricar has made of his first 100 jumps - first I sent him to the tunnel most days for six months to train and then he did AFF with Jamie - so a year after he arrived with us he has 140 jumps now and this is a video he made of the 1st 100.  I just thought I'd share it.  Thanks everyone for giving us all the videos and for taking such good care of them.  

 


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#2 Scotty

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 05:03 PM

It was a pleasure to look after Jamie and the group; looking forward to hearing of his progress.


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#3 DeeBeeGee

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Posted 17 September 2013 - 10:09 PM

only one shoe was harmed in the making of this video

 

friggin ace! and somewhat different to my first 100 jumps


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#4 AdamB

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Posted 18 September 2013 - 07:44 PM

Wow, wish I had rich parents! Half my first hundred jumps were spent on raps! Nice vids


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#5 AntipodeanLad

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Posted 19 September 2013 - 08:32 AM

Living the dream. Wow.


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#6 jamiesmum

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Posted 20 September 2013 - 09:48 AM

more a single parent goan1 who's prepared to forego a new car or a holiday to pay for my son's flying - if you have the opportunity to make your kids dreams come true it's worth a bit of sacrifice but don't ever think this stuff comes easy - apart from anything else Jamie is prepared to give up all his time to train and train and train to fly at this level 


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#7 BASE813

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 07:31 AM

more a single parent goan1 who's prepared to forego a new car or a holiday to pay for my son's flying....


Wow, that's a tough life you have.

That's a little different to my single parent upbringing where my mother was prepared to forego meals to pay for her sons food.

Don't use 'single parent' position to suggest a struggle.....

Edited by BASE813, 21 September 2013 - 07:39 AM.

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#8 jamiesmum

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 09:02 AM

wow - interesting - we could do the whole "who's had it harder" I could point out that  I've gone without food (I lost 7 stone in 8 months because I couldn't afford to feed myself and my child) and I lived without electricity for nearly a year (washing reusable nappies in the sink with old bottles of shampoo) and point out that I clawed my way back up from being well below the poverty line - why do people have an issue with the fact that having arrived at a point that I can now afford it (but not without giving up on other things - I still don't have a kitchen and have lived without one for the past two years for example) that I chose to pay for my son's skydiving - people just look at where things are now and make all these judgement - they just assume that everything just fell in our laps when you know absolutely nothing about me.

 

It is SO sad - I have met so many lovely people in skydiving who have been so kind and so supportive and then there are people who just make snap judgement and it seems to seriously annoy them that I am prepared to put my son's flying first

 

you get one life - I am prepared to do everything I can to help my son live his dreams - where on earth is the crime in that? 


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#9 BASE813

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 09:27 AM

You reacted to the 'rich parents' comment with the fact that you are a single parent having to give up holidays and new cars to pay for this dream. With that information, I felt that it was a disjointed retort.

It's not a competition on who had a tougher life, and it sounds like you have had it tough. However, if you are in a financial position to now fund your sons dream, embrace that, acknowledge you are lucky to be able to do so, but don't hold onto the prior life and think that giving up holidays and new cars is in anyway similar to the struggle you experienced previously.

All I felt was you reacted to being called rich by using the suffering single mother angle, and even though you obviously were at one point, I don't think you can say that now.

I came from a poor upbringing, and I am very thankful that I don't have to life that life anymore, but I am also humble that not being able to buy a brand new car because I choose to spend money on parachute sports isn't what I call a tough compromise, I call it fortunate.

Sorry if I offended you, it was a reaction to your defensive response.

We are lucky people...

Peace, love, and respect...
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#10 jamiesmum

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 09:55 AM

thanks - I am very sensitive about it - I spend around 80% of my annual income on Jamie's flying and Jamie trains when he's not feeling at all well (he has chronic fatigue syndrome as well as his well documented learning difficulties) and then people often comment "well if I trained as much as he does I'd be good too" - it's got to be the only sport where some people seem to take pride in how little training they've done.  If it was a a track sport or karting or something everyone would be applauding the effort put into it - Jamie flies and trains really hard because he just wants to be able to fly as well as he possibly can - probably my fault for reading him Jonathon Livingstone Seagull as a child.  What I love is that he has discovered the joy of flying with other people and then he pushes himself even harder as he wants the best for the team.  For a child who has communication problems, watching him come out of his shell and interact with other people and push himself to be better so the team can progress has been such a joy to me.  


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#11 BASE813

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 10:09 AM

That's extremely cool. I was unaware if his particular background.

Peace, love, and human flight...
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#12 jamiesmum

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Posted 21 September 2013 - 10:31 AM

Ricar who made this video is Jamie's carer.  I wanted to find a skydiver who'd be Jamie's carer but I couldn't find one, so in the end I found a carer who was prepared to learn to skydive.  Jamie has Asperger's Syndrome and some people said he shouldn't be allowed to skydive, but what we did was spend a LOT of time training him in the tunnel and then he did a lot of tandems and practiced canopy control etc and then we put together a group of people to support him through AFF etc.  This is why it's all been so tough as we've had to make absolutely sure that he is as safe as he can possibly be, not just for himself but for those around him.  What has been so lovely is how supportive people have been.  All the way the agreement has always been that if anyone had any doubts about Jamie's ability to do this he would stop.  The really amazing thing has been though how far Jamie has progressed in the rest of his life which I put down to the stuff he's learnt skydiving.  He started college this week just as a "regular" student and people who meet him now usually don't realise that he has any sort of learning difficulty which is so far from where we were when he first started out in the tunnel.  


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#13 BlueSkyBri

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 01:27 PM

it's got to be the only sport where some people seem to take pride in how little training they've done.


It's a weird kind of justification. Like when you were at school and never admitted to revising before an exam or admitting that you worked hard. It's difficult to win a medal and therefore gain recognition, it's much easier to say that you didn't spend very much and did pretty well considering.


Jamie flies and trains really hard because he just wants to be able to fly as well as he possibly can -


If you want something bad enough, you'll be surprised how often you can find a way. For every rich kid in this sport there's someone who started off by packing and/or not buying food at the DZ, just eating leftovers from everyone else so they could do "one more jump".

If you really wanted to be a world class skydiver you'd go work for minimum wage on the reception desk at a tunnel until an instructor/tunnel rat vacancy opened up.



We are lucky people...

Peace, love, and respect...

Definitely.
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#14 jamiesmum

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 01:55 PM

sorry I don't know how to do the quote things, but dbac said:

 

"If you want something bad enough, you'll be surprised how often you can find a way. For every rich kid in this sport there's someone who started off by packing and/or not buying food at the DZ, just eating leftovers from everyone else so they could do "one more jump".


If you really wanted to be a world class skydiver you'd go work for minimum wage on the reception desk at a tunnel until an instructor/tunnel rat vacancy opened up."

 

I would think it would be better to get a really good job, earning as much money as you can and the pay for really good coaches/tunnel time etc rather than trying to get a job on minimum wage working at a tunnel where they seem to want you to sell them your soul for the chance to fly.  Why is it that it's only considered noble if you've suffered for it? 

 

I know there is no possibility of Jamie ever winning gold in the tunnel as he's up against people who own their own wind tunnels and people who work in the sport 24/7.  He does it for the FUN of it, not because he's looking to make skydiving a career.  It's being part of a team and pushing yourself.  I don't see why people have an issue with the fact I pay for it.  He's 16.  He's at college studying.  

 

Flying is what he does to transcend the problems of his every day life and I'm prepared to do everything I can to make that happen for him.

 

I just don't get why people have a problem with it.  If you won the lottery, would you say "oh, I don't have to struggle to pay for this any more - I should give up skydiving to give the people who do a chance?" or would you go out and buy yourself a new rig to celebrate and jump as much as you could?

 

Oh well, I probably should take my friends' advice and not go posting on the forum for fear of people having a go at me and it upsetting me (which it does) but I'd just like to know where the crime is in helping people to fly?

 


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#15 Joellercoaster

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 02:50 PM

I think, if I can presume to speak for someone else, that Brian may have been being supportive, in his own unique way.

Jamiesmum, please keep posting about him and his story. There's a lot of us who find it fascinating - the fact that he's fortunate enough to be funded by someone else is nice for him but it's not really central to the story. People find a way to do what drives them.
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#16 AntipodeanLad

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 03:13 PM

If you want something bad enough, you'll be surprised how often you can find a way. For every rich kid in this sport there's someone who started off by packing and/or not buying food at the DZ, just eating leftovers from everyone else so they could do "one more jump".

If you really wanted to be a world class skydiver you'd go work for minimum wage on the reception desk at a tunnel until an instructor/tunnel rat vacancy opened up.
 


I read this as a supportive comment too. 

Had the pleasure of seeing Jamie fly on Friday night. It was only after we left the tunnel that I realized I was standing in the spectator area right next to you for a bit, jamiesmum. If I had known then that it was you, I would have said hello :) I agree with Joellercoaster, please ignore negative comments and continue keeping us up to date with Jamie's journey, I know I find it rather fascinating and inspiring too.  :thumbs:


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#17 jamiesmum

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 03:21 PM

thanks for the replies - I have similar issues to Jamie so I don't always get subtleties of meanings - I find going to the tunnel really stressful, especially when it's busy and I find DZ's even harder so I don't go often - there was a really lovely guy called Duncan at Bodyflight on Friday who chatted to me a lot and helped me to stay calm and I met two Brian's which confused me a lot and I finally got to meet Viki who kindly packed for Jamie once (I am WAY too scared to let him pack his own rig yet).  Sometimes I think maybe I just read things wrong but I am doing the best I can and thanks for bearing with me.  


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#18 AntipodeanLad

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 03:25 PM

Duncan and I did our AFF together, really nice guy. I was hovering around the spectator area when you were chattin to Brian and Viki during Jamie's final round of the Scrambles. Will be sure to say Hi next time!  :)


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#19 BlueSkyBri

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 03:34 PM

Yup, being supportive. Always. And yes, please keep posting.

You and Jamie want something and you want it bad enough to make it happen. Bravo. Many other people, probably me included, don't want it badly enough and so excuses get made when we don't get as far as we could have.

And Joel, you can speak for me as long as you say nice things.

best
Brian

Edited by dbac, 24 September 2013 - 03:34 PM.

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#20 purpletaboofreak

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Posted 24 September 2013 - 06:22 PM

Yeah keep posting Jamie's mum, his progress and story is all very inspiring! 😆
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